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Noma: My Perfect Storm

With automatic access to genius, René Redzepi plays with wilderness and interprets a forgotten edible world into a culinary language we all understand.

Noma my perfect storm is a creative journey into the unique mind of René Redzepi.

How did René Redzepi manage to revolutionize the entire world of gastronomy, inventing the alphabet and vocabulary that would infuse newfound pedigree to Nordic cuisine and establish a new edible world while radically changing the image of the modern chef? His story has the feel of a classic fairy tale: the ugly duckling transformed into a majestic swan, who now reigns over the realm of modern gourmet cuisine. But beneath the polished surface, cracks appear in the form of old wounds. 2013 stands as the worst year in René Redzepi’s career.

We follow him as he fights his way back to the top, reinventing NOMA and reclaiming the title of best restaurant in the world in 2014 for the fourth time.

The film is out Dec 18 in theaters, on Amazon, iTunes, etc.

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Restaurant Review: The Woods Alehouse

The Woods Alehouse in Saskatoon

I used to hate going here.  The only time we went here was when The Rook & Raven, The Congress Beer House and State & Main were all packed.  Each time I regretted it.

Then things started to turn around.  They changed the seating arrangements.  The food improved to the point where it was edible.  There seemed to be a better attitude by the serving staff.  Instead of just having a wide selection of beer, they understood that a pub needs more than that, it needs to be a place where people enjoying going to.

They now have several good things on the menu from some excellent fries to some kind of nacho thing they do with fries instead of chips.   It’s pretty incredible.

There are good sandwiches and wraps as well.  The atmosphere has changed and the serving staff is now pleasant and fun to talk with.

There is a little less seating now then there was.  It makes the place more open, relaxing and more flexible as it is a great place for game nights, poetry slams, or as a place for a big gathering.

Normally places that suck don’t turn themselves around but The Wood’s Alehouse has and in the process has made a lot of us big fans.

The Wood’s Alehouse
148 2nd Ave North 
Saskatoon, SK S7K2B2

Woods Alehouse on Urbanspoon

All.I.Can

The Walrus has more on the making of the film and this segment here.

MOSSOP WAS HOPING for rain when I visited him on location in Rossland, British Columbia, a small town plastered to a Kootenay mountainside. The film studies grad had spent most of the past two years living out of a truck stuffed full of cameras and tripods, a homemade crane, and several pairs of skis, and his hair was shaggy and unshampooed. While the rest of the town was out on the ski hill, revelling in the fresh snow, Mossop and J. P. Auclair, a darkly handsome ski pro from Quebec, sat forlornly in an empty coffee shop.

A few days earlier, they had begun filming a sequence that would make Auclair appear to be casually skiing through Rossland’s alleys, popping backflips over parked cars while an enormous nickel smelter at the foot of the mountain belched smoke in the background. To Mossop’s delight, it had been raining when they started, turning the snow grey and lending the scene a post-industrial gloom perfect for his purposes; to make it look like one continuous scene, however, the conditions had to hold, and unfortunately the temperature had dropped a critical few degrees.

“It’s puking,” said Auclair with a sigh, gazing out the window at the enormous flakes drifting down.

“Horrible,” Mossop agreed, raising an eyebrow. “We must be the first skiers on earth to be praying for rain.”

Urban Giants

Between 1928 and 1932, Western Union and AT&T Long Lines built two of the most advanced telecommunications buildings in the world, at 60 Hudson Street and 32 Avenue of the Americas in Lower Manhattan. Nearly a century later, they remain among the world’s finest Art Deco towers—and cornerstones of global communication. “Urban Giants” is an 9-minute filmic portrait of their birth and ongoing life, combining never-before-seen-construction footage, archival photographs and films, interviews with architectural and technology historians, and stunning contemporary cinematography.