From sports

CrossFit’s insecurity is showing

Good article in Outside Magazine about the founders of Crossfit not really being team players.

I’d spent the past two-and-a-half years reporting on obstacle racing, a sport whose meteoric growth was greatly fueled by CrossFitters looking for a place to test their strength. I wanted to see what a straight-up CrossFit competition was like. Instead, my press pass was denied.

“Outside Online has published headlines and articles about CrossFit and the CrossFit Games that lead us to question Outside Magazine and Outside Online’s editorial intentions,” said the email from CrossFit Press, which arrived after we reached out to Greene. The email listed four Outside articles to which CrossFit had taken offense: a report on a Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research study that suggested CrossFit has a 16 percent injury rate, a report on the subsequent lawsuit between CrossFit and the journal (published by the National Strength and Conditioning Association), the NPFL story, and another story digging deeper into injury statistics.

No mention was made, however, of the stories we’ve published trumpeting CrossFit’s stars like four-time CrossFit Games champion Rich Froning, pointing readers to the regimen’s best boxes, or even promoting CrossFit-inspired training plans. Outside has covered all aspects of the fitness trend since it began.

With that in mind, we asked CrossFit to reevaluate its decision. CrossFit is important to us and to many of our readers. We were eager to cover the games. Again, we were rejected. This time, our email didn’t even elicit a response.

Denying our press pass is like the NFL writing, “Dear ESPN, We can’t let you cover the Super Bowl, because you covered the traumatic-brain-injury concerns of NFL players.” By CrossFit’s logic, every major media outlet in the United States should be blackballed, from the New York Times to USA Today, because we’ve all covered CrossFit injuries.

Keith Olbermann on How the NFL Encourage Violence Against Women

For years Jordon has been talking about how professional sports encourages violence against women by minimizing punishment and the actions of athletes who do violent acts.  Keith Olbermann agrees and broadcast this much watch segment on how women are treated by the media, by their colleagues, and by other athletes and how that leads to violence.  Even if you are not a sports fan, watch the video.

The ‘World Cup Is Over, Now What?’ Guide to Soccer

From Grantland

Just because the World Cup is over doesn’t mean soccer stops. Soccer never stops; that’s one of its biggest appeals. There are so many different teams, leagues, club competitions, and international tournaments that, if you want to, you can always find someone to cheer for or some team to root against. It can also be a bit daunting to wade into without any experience. Luckily, you have me, your Russian Premier League–watching, tactics board–chalking, Opta Stats–devouring Gandalf, to help you tailor your soccer-watching habits

Jordon is a Manchester United fan but I think I am going to stay in North America.  It comes down to Toronto FC, Montreal Impact, or Vancouver Whitecaps.  Since I live in the west, I going with the Vancouver Whitecaps (Jordon just left the house and is filing for divorce).  

Place Place

Does anyone actually cheer for the Canadian Men’s National Soccer Team.  I’d cheer for the Guyanese National Football Team but they haven’t played a game since 2012.