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Understanding PTSD’s Effects on Brain, Body, and Emotions

PTSD disrupts the lives of average individuals as well as combat veterans who have served their country. The person experiencing the trauma often then impacts the lives of his/her family, friends, and workplaces. PTSD does not distinguish between race, age or gender and often goes undiagnosed. Even with proper diagnosis, many individuals do not know where to turn to get help. Society needs to understand the aftermath of trauma especially combat trauma and how to prepare for warriors when they return home.

5 Ways to Get Kids Into Nature

I love these adventure and parenting tips from Outside Magazine’s Katie Arnold

5 Ways to Get Kids Into Nature

3.  Become a Weather Warrior

As a culture, we are plagued with a “pandemic of inactivity,” says Louv, who argues that rain, sleet, heat, or snow are no reason to stay inside. Show your kids how to tap into the beauty of all the seasons. In winter, freeze sheets of black construction paper and use them to catch and examine falling snowflakes (they won’t melt on contact) with a small magnifier. Keep an “instant snowman” kit at the ready: rocks or black buttons for eyes; hats and scarves; a carrot nose; twig arms.When spring rains come, make a rain-gauge. In summer, plan family picnics in the park; come fall, hunt and gather leaves, acorns, seed pods, and other collections in a clear, glass “wonder bowl” on the kitchen counter.

4. Expand Perimeters

An acquaintance recently told me that when her son was high school, he used to get up at 5 a.m., fill two glass jugs with boiling water, and drive an hour across the Golden Gate Bridge with his friends into San Francisco to surf before class. When he was done, he’d rinse himself off with the hot water and drive to school in time for the first bell. I love this story because it reminds all of us that as children grow, their geographic boundaries will expand naturally. It’s our job as parents to allow this to happen. Keep little ones close at hand or within view outside but as they grow, encourage them to develop their own relationship with nature, whether it’s through finding their own contemplative “sit-spot” to quietly observe the plant and animal life and weather or, as they reach middle school and high school, exploring the neighborhood by bike, meeting friends for nature walks, or starting their own hiking clubs.

How a Toronto family bought a school house in the country and made a new home.

From the Globe and Mail

How a Toronto family bought a school house in the country and made a new home.

Soon the girls were riding their scooters and roller skating down the corridor, Ms. Hawkins says. Walls were brightened with fresh white paint and new closets were built in all the rooms.

They bought a showroom kitchen from an ad on Kijiji and turned the former gym into a great room with the added perk of a stage for musical and theatrical performances.

Reya, Wini and Ruby each have a full-sized classroom for a bedroom. The former kindergarteners’ area has been repurposed as a mud room and the staff lounge has been turned into a guest kitchen.

By the summer of 2014 the place was so transformed that neighbours with a bed and breakfast suggested they start one of their own. Local businesses had more visitors than they could accommodate.South in Milford

“The community was great – they would send their excess.”

The school’s layout turned out to be ideal. Their B&B, called South in Milford, now has three suites open to guests in the summer months.

Two classrooms each have ensuite bathrooms, kitchenettes, sitting areas and doors to the outside. A massive two-bedroom suite combines the former library and offices.

Many inns in the county won’t accept guests with children or dogs, Ms. Hawkins says, so they accept families with both.

You can also read more about their adventures in their blog, Letters from the Lunchroom.  It is a great read.